After a successful career in sports journalism at Sports Illustrated, ESPN, and Bleacher Report, as well as a key storytelling role at the National Basketball Players Association, Jared Zwerling launched the first dedicated media platform focused on sharing basketball players’ lives off the court. 

On this Episode of The Besomebody Podcast:

6:30 It began with storytelling. “I had my first gig as a newspaper writer from my middle school at 8 years old. I wrote my first article about an ambidextrous pitcher who could pitch both 90mph, lefty and righty. I was so fascinated by that story and by athletes and how they got into their craft – the story behind the story. That’s what set it off for me. It came very naturally, just telling stories.” -JZ

24:24 The impact of the pandemic on the sports media industry. “We have often talked about the yin and yang, the bipolar nature of the effect of the pandemic on different industries. At first glance, we’re like, ‘Quarantine must have been the best thing ever for CloseUp360,’ because players are at home and they have all this free time. When you add on the layer that you’re also now competing with ESPN, Sports Illustrated, Bleacher Report, Uninterrupted – everyone vying for that free time because there is no ‘on the court’ time – your point of difference became a little less prevalent.” -KS

26:37 The need for GREAT content. “Everyone has to be super creative and offer as much value as possible. Because we work directly with players, we just can’t create content just to create content. We have to go to a player and say, ‘This will create value for you and here’s why.’ The level of access and the level of ideas we come up with have to be greater and more compelling for a player to say, ‘You know what, I want to work directly with CloseUp to do that.’ It’s a different approach to just being a traditional media outlet in that regard.” -JZ

45:05 The startup grind. “When you work for a startup, you have to be able to sacrifice and push through the grind. It’s not going to be easy all the time. It’s not a corporate job where you have a steady paycheck and benefits. It’s a different mindset when you work for a startup. You have to be able to be ready for anything and pivot.” -JZ

48:20 Advertising as revenue. We used to always talk about how difficult the advertising as revenue business is within media, and how margins become very tight and tough. That’s always been hard. Now with companies spending less on marketing, less on advertising, with more content platforms out there, and a lot more conglomerates purchasing media platforms – it’s tough. At Besomebody, we’ve been a media company for a long time. We’ve never monetized it because our strategy has always been to use content as a growth platform for audience size, and then figure out what to do with the audience. We took a couple cracks at it and weren’t as successful as we hoped to be. And now we’re back at it again after we pivoted and built a core revenue stream. As Jared talked about, passion is the lead, but then you’ve got to pay the bills.” -KS   

50:46 Kash’s One Big Thing. “We need to start thinking of new business models. We need to start thinking of new ways to generate revenue that haven’t been built before. You can’t use the old ‘tried and true’ models anymore. We have to do some things differently – whether that’s how we partner, through shared revenue, through media and licensing agreements, or through looking at venture capital in a different way. The game has changed, so we have to think about things very differently. The companies that are emerging right now and the companies that are going to succeed are going to say, ‘How do I have to play the game differently moving forward?’” -KS

Born in small-town Tennessee, at a young age, Jerry Porter went from working across the country to living across the world. His time as an R&D leader at the world’s largest Consumer Products Goods (CPG) company transported him to life in Japan, Germany, and hundreds of places in between. Through it all, he’s found power in the shared human experience, and optimism in the evolving American landscape. 

On this Episode of The Besomebody Podcast:

16:30 Purpose. “That’s been the journey and the joy of being at P&G, of really bringing to life that purpose. At times you get into the conversation, ‘C’mon, you just make consumer goods.’ But when you really see how it intersects and interplays in the lives of the consumer, it really does elevate the quality of the day, and what it really means to take care of your family.” -JP

31:10 No going back. “It feels different this time. The energy and the inertia behind it are different. There’s a lot of elements and ingredients to it. There’s a lot of pent up frustration over the last four years. There’s a lot of celebrities, athletes, and influencers now speaking out in ways they haven’t before. There’s the content and the video we’ve seen. But, just overall, the tipping point seems to have been reached and breached on this one.” -KS

33:33 Why now is different than before. “I think versus things in the past where it was a small subset of folks really pushing it, this is broad. Folks are saying, ‘No, we want a better world. The pendulum swings towards justice, and that’s the world that we want to have.’ I think it’s also a counterbalance to some of the negativity and ugliness that’s just been pervasive. The voices that really have been heard over the past three years have had more of a negative piece and haven’t necessarily represented – I don’t believe – the better angels and the majority of folks who just want the best for their kids and expect the best for everyone else.” -JP

40:33 Brands need to speak up. “Courageous leadership is a perfect phrase because that’s what is needed. We’ve been talking since the onset of COVID how now is the time for companies to really focus on brand purpose and values. It’s not the time to market your products, it’s time to talk about what you believe in. With what happened in Minneapolis and all the events afterward, it’s even more so a time for people and companies to take the stage, take the platform and say, ‘This is who we are, this is what we believe.’” -KS

43:38 Jerry’s advice to move forward. “You’ve got to persevere. These things – if they don’t kill you, they make you stronger. You need to figure out how you’re going to navigate that. Along the way, build those relationships that – as the old African proverb says, ‘If you want to go fast, go alone; if you want to go far, go together.’ How are you bringing folks along that will support you and fortify you as you get to those down times to help you carry on? That’s been a piece that has enabled me to move forward.” -JP

48:44 Kash’s One Big Thing. “If you can’t go across the world, go across the country. If you can’t go across the country, go across the state. If you can’t go across the state, go to a different part of your city. If you can’t go to a different part of your city, go to a new part of your neighborhood that you’ve never been to before. And if you can’t do that, then walk down to the edge of your driveway, and sit there and experience things from a different perspective. Because that’s the only way you start to understand people who are unlike you. That’s the only way that you learn that we’re all more similar than we are different.” -KS

Born in Venezuela, Andrea Diquez moved to New York City with a passion for theater. A few months later, she was in the throws at one of the largest and most successful Advertising Agencies in the world. Twenty-five years and numerous big accounts later – including Tide, Coca-Cola, and Toyota – she runs the company. She continues to lead with passion, optimism and positivity, and a contagious desire to do great work. 

On this Episode of The Besomebody Podcast:

8:31 Brands speaking up. “Sixty-eight percent of consumers say that they find it helpful when companies or brands are addressing coronavirus in advertising. Sixty-two percent of consumers say that when companies or brands are addressing the current crisis, that means that the brands have the consumers’ best interests at heart. Even though it’s a time when people, brands, leaders, marketing directors, and CEOs are a little nervous about taking these courageous and bold steps with their marketing and advertising, the data tells us that’s what people want. That’s what consumers want to see, what they expect. In a lot of ways, not saying something right now says more about you as a brand and a company than anything else.” -KS

17:58 Passion for the client’s brand. “You have to love the brand that you’re working on. I’m not going to come up with stuff that is going to destroy the brand or kill the brand. I’m actually on the same page as the client – when I work on a brand, I give it my all, as if it was mine. I really take care of it, and I get the team to take care of it and love it. Regardless of the brand. With all the brands that I’ve worked on, some are more difficult than others, but if you love it and you nurture it, then good stuff happens. Sometimes it takes two, three, four years, but it happens…I love the brands I work on and I really dedicate time to being part of the work.” -AD

29:46 Andrea on being herself. “I’ve never not been myself. My bosses have always been okay with that…I love that all my bosses have let me be who I am. Sometimes they’re a little scared, I think, but they’ve let me be who I am and that’s great. That’s why I’ve been successful. People ask me, ‘Was it hard being Venezuelan and getting to where you are?’ No – I’m here because I’m Venezuelan. I’m different. And people embrace those differences, and they were okay with it. They figured that by adding me to the mix things would become even better. I was very lucky with all my bosses, I still am.” -AD

32:19 Adding value to the client. “The last thing I wanted to be at our sister company, BSB Group International, is a “Yes sir, no sir” agency. I don’t want to just be executing what the client says to do. I always want to be able to have a point of view, have our personal passion, and expertise. I want to be able to say, as embedded strategic business partners, ‘Here’s what we recommend and why we believe in it so much.’ That’s something that I learned from you and from the Saatchi team.” – KS

38:34 Maintaining consistency with change. “When clients change, the first thing I do is try to understand a little bit what the client is – who the person is, where they come from, what they’re used to seeing. If it’s another company, it’s another company, if it’s the same company in another country or with another brand, I try to really understand a little bit of the background and understand where they’re coming from and what their forte is. That’s how we start our relationship in an orientation on what we do. It’s focused on what that person’s strength is. Or, I’m never scared of saying, ‘I don’t know too much about this, but this is a challenge we had and here’s how your people helped us.’ And always demonstrating that we love the brand, we know the brand, and we share the passion for growing the brand. And we’re there to build it with them.” -AD

44:08 The Triple Win. “For us, we always believe in the triple win: it’s a win for the customer, meaning it’s adding value to the customer; it’s a win for the business, meaning it’s driving revenue or profit; and it’s a win for the client, and for that in the corporate world it actually means that they’re ascending, that they’re getting promoted and getting recognized. Some folks on my team were like, ‘Well that means that we’re going to lose some of those clients that we have great relationships with.’ But that’s what we want – as long as we’re losing them because they’re going up and they’re ascending, whether it’s at that company or somewhere else, then we did something right and we’re on the right side of it. Then our challenge is to do that again with the next crop that comes in.” -KS

1:21:33 Kash’s One Big Thing. “You can’t talk about it unless you’re about it behind your own closed doors, inside your own company. A lot of brands are coming to the forefront right now saying, ‘We want to take a stance, we have an opinion, we want to join the conversation of what’s happening today in our society and our culture.’ There are so many issues that have been pushed to the forefront. But you can’t talk about it in a credible or authentic way if you haven’t addressed it within your own household, family, or company. You can’t talk about diversity if you don’t have a leadership team that’s diverse or if you don’t have a marketing strategy that connects with multiple cultures and multiple types of people. That’s so important. Before we talk about what we can do and how we can evolve our communications externally, we need to take this as an opportunity to look at ourselves and reevaluate how we’ve been running our companies, businesses, households, and families. That’s the opportunity we have today – use all the issues, conflict, and conversation that’s in front of us as a mirror to look at ourselves, what we control, and the fingerprints that we leave on everything we touch. And make sure that we feel great about that impact before we decide how we’re going to market ourselves. That call to action of authenticity and realness is so important.” -KS

A son of academics and a student of both science and culture, Dr. Santa Ono has always fought the good fight. After years helping build the University of Cincinnati into a winning national brand, he’s now battling COVID-19 north of the border at the University of British Columbia as he works to ready his campus for reopening in the Fall.

On this Episode of The Besomebody Podcast:

5:31 Concerns with the state of education. Nationwide, 17% of students don’t even have a computer at home – according to analysis done by The Associated Press – and 18% of students don’t have broadband internet access. When you think about the expanding divide between ‘the haves’ and ‘the have nots,’ it makes this scary. I’m excited that we’re coming out with, and enhancing and elevating, all these online learning tools, but I’m also concerned about the folks who don’t have access.” -KS

23:08 A global learning from COVID-19. “The biggest thing that we’ve learned from this pandemic is the world has been unprepared. Japan is totally unprepared, the U.S. was unprepared, we’re unprepared. I don’t know anywhere that was really ready. One of the things that we have to take away from this is you can’t start investing in research, you can’t start investing in a pandemic response organization or infrastructure in a nation, when it happens, you have to be ready before. It can happen anytime.” -SO

30:20 COVID-19’s effects on universities. “It’s amazing to think about all the variables, all the impacts this pandemic has created across the board, across the line, from the smallest businesses to the largest corporations. I really believe at the university setting it combines all the aspects because it’s the human element, it’s the learning and the student element, it’s the business element, it’s the sports element. It’s crazy.” -KS

38:47 The coming mental health pandemic. “The next pandemic after COVID-19 is going to be the mental health pandemic. You can already see it…If you look at individuals that are calling into help lines, if you follow the number of women who are accessing support services from being battered, there’s an escalation. I think when you have such a hit to the economy, with the millions of people filing for unemployment or support from the government, that’s not a good situation. And you compound upon that the fact that people, families are isolated. So, they may be struggling with ideas of self-worth and self-confidence. They can’t get out, they can’t let off steam, that’s a real problem.” -SO

48:18 Dr. Ono’s message to the Class of 2020. “The moral of the story, which I hope means something to any of those people, high school kids or university graduates, is that sometimes struggle makes you a stronger person. Sometimes struggle makes you into a better person. My hope for them, and my belief in them, is that this struggle, which is very significant, will eventually be something that makes them stronger, more resilient. It will prepare them to be even better than they might have been. It’s hard to believe when you’re looking at your life from being a very young person, but I can tell you that it’s true. Whatever their challenges are, they will persist, and will emerge more resilient and even better.” -SO

52:24 Kash’s One Big Thing.  “I ran into someone one day and he told me, ‘Hey, I appreciate and acknowledge what you gave up to go after this dream that you have.’ But he said, ‘Just remember that sacrifice is the first step. After the sacrifice comes the struggle. After the struggle comes the suffering. And then after you suffer, then you’ll succeed. So, don’t stop.’ It still gives me goose bumps to this day because he gave the road map of how to build, grow, and succeed.” -KS

After helping lead his family business to a multimillion-dollar exit, a tragic loss and a life-changing injury shifted Badal Shah’s perspective. His road to recovery led him to the forefront of the growing CBD industry, and now he’s looking to make his most meaningful mark.

On this Episode of The Besomebody Podcast:

4:30 Traits of a winning team player. “There’s winning leadership behavior, winning leadership characteristics that people can still display and show, even if they’re lower on the continuum of capacity and work. Even if you’re a 4, 5 or 6, which isn’t really good for our company, but you’re displaying winning behavior, myself as a leader can notice it. That’s the character of the type of person that we want.” -KS

11:11 Badal’s early experiences with entrepreneurship. “My father was an entrepreneur. Seeing him growing up and his grind, sacrifice, and never being around – not by choice but by necessity – to make it work for our family was just something that really became engrained in me. My first entrepreneurial experience was with him and the family chemical business. Myself, my brother and father built a business that taught me a lot of things. It was really the hustle of doing it from scratch and bootlegging, trying to make something out of very little.” – BS

14:02 The evolving definition of “success.” “We sold [the chemical company] in January 2017 – you think you’ve been waiting for this moment, put in all this blood, sweat, and tears waiting for the wires to come in. You think that’s the biggest moment of your life. Three minutes after the wire hit, my best friend’s wife passed away. It just hit me in terms of what is really important in life. From that moment I wanted to challenge myself to be highly passionate in what I was doing and then also have impact. That became very important. You always think about what success means, then you achieve some of it and you realize that definition was wrong the whole time.” -BS

16:17 Money as a motivation. “I finally realized money isn’t number one. It’s in my top three – it’s number three. Number one is to make a positive impact on the world – legacy, things like that. Number two is to build that mechanism that makes that impact with people that I love and care about – people I love going to work with, and I enjoy being around. Number three is to hopefully be successful and make some money doing it. That’s really helped me get my mind where it needs to be. If I didn’t have the number one, that broader purpose, then I wouldn’t be fulfilled in the work…but also if I didn’t have number three, the financial, then I wouldn’t be able to serve as many people. I always see money as a symptom, not a purpose. Being able to build a successful business enables you to employ more people, help more people, make some more investments, and grow. The balance of those three things – of the impact that you’re making in number one, the right people around you, and then strong business and financial success as well – has been pretty powerful.” -KS

33:28 Preparing for leading in the post-COVID space. “How do we end on the other side of this pandemic as a market leader? We’re doing things, making investments, continuing with our growth plans. For example, we’re adding some highly sophisticated technical capabilities to be able to come out on the other side of this to be positioned as one of the leaders in the space that can both serve the industry from the B2B side, but also with two brands that are scalable and ready for global growth.” -BS

42:25 Kash’s One Big Thing. “So many entrepreneurs have to make these quick, gut, strategic decisions that blend both art and science, without a ton of data. But you still have to take that risk; you still have to go for something. When it works, everyone is applauding you and telling you how smart you are, how you’re a genius. When it doesn’t, you’re an idiot. That’s why you can’t get wrapped up in the wins and losses. You can’t get wrapped up in the applause or ‘boos’ you get, the love or hate you get from other people. You have to believe in what you’re doing, believe in the decision you made at that time, and make sure you’ve made it for the right reasons. You take the result as it comes. The same people that are calling you a genius today, are going to call you an idiot tomorrow.” -KS

Kroger Health, the healthcare arm of America’s largest grocery chain (The Kroger Co.), serves more than 14 million people each year across 2,200 pharmacies, 220 clinics, and multiple telehealth solutions. As the country’s 5th largest retail healthcare organization, it sits in a space of its own at the intersection of food and medicine. Colleen Lindholz has been passionately guiding the company’s work in this area for years. Today, she’s taking on COVID-19 while also preparing the company for a world where healthy diet, immunity, and wellness will be more important than ever.

On this Episode of The Besomebody Podcast:

11:07 The opportunity of a lifetime. “It’s an honor to be given the opportunity to lead on the frontlines of the frontlines. I’ve been in the industry for 25 years and I’ve never seen a time like we’re seeing right now. I’ve never seen people come together like I’m seeing right now. The collective efforts of the 460,000 people that work for The Kroger Company across the country has just been amazing. Amazing to see people being a part of something bigger than themselves…Every decision that we make is grounded in our values and our purpose…to feed the human spirit. We’ve never seen it like we’re seeing it right now come alive, whether it be in our stores or beyond our four walls. The work that we’re doing with the government to expand the COVID testing locations has just been a true testament to who we are and what we believe in. It’s definitely been a whirlwind, but it’s an honor to be a part of it.” -CL

12:18 What companies need to be doing right now. “Now more than ever it’s so important for companies to really live and breathe their values, purpose, mission, and vision. Lots of times its words on a paper, but I’ve always seen it come to life in the work you’ve been doing and what Kroger’s been doing. But it’s so critical right now…People are looking for hope and inspiration during this time.” -KS

27:41 Colleen on the power of commitment. “It’s a lot about commitment, it’s a lot about where you come from, who you are, your purpose in life in general. I know why I’m put on this earth, and I’m not going to stop pushing for change, I think that there’s a lot of change that needs to happen in our country, and I believe in it. Commitment, when you commit yourself to something, and you say, ‘I’m going to go do this no matter who pushes back.’ When there’s adversity and doubters all around you, you just have to stay persistent.” -CL

37:54 Traits of great leaders. “I really believe the greatest leaders lead with integrity. They lead with passion, as well as intellect. If you just have the smarts but don’t have the passion and integrity, you’re not going to be a great leader. When you have all three amazing things can happen.” -KS

40:06 The most important value. “I think just being authentic and being who you are and not trying to be something different, and doing what you say you’re going to do. Don’t go say something and not go do it…I want people to say, ‘She’s real…what she says, she goes and does.’ I always put authenticity and trust up there. With my team, I tell them, ‘If I cannot trust you, it doesn’t matter how smart you are, it doesn’t matter how many letters you have behind your name…it doesn’t matter what your experience is, it doesn’t matter to me.’ It does not matter, what matters is that I can trust you.” -CL

47:57 Kash’s One Big Thing. “When you want to succeed – when you want to win – you want to have not only the best people that do great work, but people that you can trust. The people that you’ve already been in the wars with, that you’ve been in the trenches with. That you trust to have your left side, your right side when you’re going into battle. You have to have that shared mission, vision, and values. You have to be able to connect ‘on the court and off the court’ because if you don’t, you’re never going to make it happen.” -KS

After laboring through job after unfulfilling job, Davey Callinan found his passion in the real and raw sanctuary of the Barber Shop. But along the way, this Master Barber from Black Label Barbershop discovered a greater calling that stretches far beyond the confines of his chair. And he shares that gift with everyone he meets.

On this Episode of The Besomebody Podcast:

21:15 How Davey became a barber.  “It was something that really taught me about finding security in myself. A confidence builder. You have to accept your flaws and that no matter how old you are or how mature you are, if you don’t know how to do it, you don’t know how to do it. So, the kid could be ten years younger beside you doing better than you, but you can’t have an ego because it doesn’t matter. Where does your experience lie?”  -DC

22:37 Keeping the right people around you. “People forget how important it is to find that person who can guide you through your personal and/or professional life. People always attach themselves to the wrong type of people. But you took a moment after ten years of grinding on things that you didn’t want to do, that weren’t fulfilling you, that you knew weren’t unleashing your full potential. You said, ‘This is a person that I see doing something and I want to follow in his footsteps. And maybe I’m not going to be a carbon copy, but I’m going to take some things, I’m going to learn some things, I’m going to make them my own, I’m going to go build something great.’” – KS

25:57 Our reason for existing. “I hadn’t been through it, I hadn’t experienced the sacrifice, struggle and suffering you need to go through to become humble enough, bold enough, and smart enough to be able to get over your fears and insecurities. That enabled me to finally love myself, believe in myself, and then start seeing people and saying, ‘I see something in you that maybe you don’t see. But I want to get it out of you, and I’m going to push you.’ I personally believe if we don’t get it out of you, what are you here for? If you leave something in the tank and the world doesn’t get to benefit and be blessed by the gift that you have, why the hell are we here?” -KS

30:20 The power of self-belief.  “When you truly believe in yourself, you stop considering what someone else is going to perceive you to be in the process of getting there. I feel like a lot of people all too often consider the thought of what they look like making the move because they’re thinking about the step they’re making and not the destination they’re going towards.” -DC

32:47 Expecting the punches.  “When I believe in myself, I could be down in the dumps, I could be knocked down on the ground on my hands and knees. But the thing is I know, personally, beat down, I’m going to get back up. So, if I see you give up on me, that’s fine, I just take inventory of that. I don’t let that weigh me down…When you make tribulation your tradition, you don’t get bogged down in a hardship. Because sometimes people get so bogged down…when you make it your tradition you accept it as the norm. Because I got news for you, and you already know it, when you’re going through a tough time, the universe doesn’t have any quota for you in your tough time…the next ones on the way. The quicker you get past it and accept it, and improvise, and adapt, and overcome, and move forward, the better off you are.” -DC

49:10 Kash’s One Big Thing. “The one big thing for me is that the universe is always talking. If you’re focused, faithful, and resilient towards your vision, the place that you want to go, and the person you want to become. If you keep believing you’re going to run into people all over that will help you get there. It might not be with money, a job, or with advice in the standard typical way. It might be with just one word, one look, or a high five. I’ve had that so many times in my life, if I look back at the road that we’ve been on the last ten years. Because I kept the belief and I was centered in where we wanted to go, I was blessed to run across these people. And you can’t overlook anybody…Be open, be willing, and be ready to take that inspiration and guidance from anyone and anything that you see because the signals and the signs are out there. The people, those beacons, are out there for you, if you’re willing to hear them. On the flip side, no matter who you are, what you do, what your job is, how young or old, you could be that person that’s inspiring someone, motivating someone, or pushing someone to go do the thing that they want to do. That’s a powerful thing. That’s a power that every single one of us have and it’s a power that we often forget.” -KS

After growing his company with a first-of-its-kind business model that pushed him to the forefront of Austin, Texas’ fitness scene, Shawn Martinez lost 100% of his locations when gyms were forced to close due to Coronavirus. Now, he’s balancing the need to recover with the urgency to evolve.

On this Episode of The Besomebody Podcast:

18:37 Shawn’s growth strategy. “It’s always been about relationships. Relationships have always been our currency…I didn’t want [the strategy] to be volume, I didn’t want to just be at every apartment in the U.S. We’ve always been very selective about what properties we partner with. We want to make sure the gym is hospitable to training, we want it to be top notch, we want to pick property managers that believe in the vision so we can work together and really be a blessing to all the people that live there by doing some really cool programs and just being creative in the space. We weren’t really in a rush to grow, we wanted more of the right partner.” -SM

24:36 The impact of COVID-19. “We make money two main ways. The apartments pay us a fee for our program and then we make revenue from our personal trainers. Without gym access we literally lost 50% of our revenue overnight. I wasn’t going to take a penny from our trainers if they weren’t going to be able to get access [to gyms]. I had to rethink how we were going to be able to hold on to our trainers.” -SM

28:03 Supporting the personal trainers. “One of the things I really respected about the Besomebody chapter that I was part of is that you guys took the time to interview and put together this really high-quality production of people talking about themselves, what makes them ‘them.’ I feel like there’s so much power in that, and that’s what we’re doing. What makes these people unique, and not as trainers, but as people. And we’re trying to pump that out to the world and trying to get [the trainers] some business.” -SM

29:18 The power of brand equity right now. “Brand equity, brand purpose, what your brand believes and stands for is so important right now. This is the only time – definitely in our lives, in this generation, most likely in the last century – that everyone in the world is experiencing the same thing at the same time. We’re all feeling the same thing, we have the same fears and anxieties. We also feel for our neighbors, our colleagues, our businesses, our friends that run local establishments that are going through this. Now is a time where people are rallying together, people do believe we’re in this together. The companies and businesses that double-down on purpose and values and show who they are in a positive way, are going to be rewarded with business after this is all over.” -KS

32:20 The value of vulnerability.  “All those times where I was very nervous to hit ‘publish’ or ‘post’ on the post because I thought, ‘I’m being so honest, I’m sharing my soul.’ Those are the posts, messages and stories that connected the most with people. It wasn’t about the likes and the comments, it was the fact that somebody said, “Thank you so much for sharing that. That really impacted me.’ There is so much power in being courageous enough to be vulnerable.” -KS

40:12 Kash’s One Big Thing. “Where I’ve seen the most value in our journey and in my personal life, is taking the time to really invest in those select few. All I need is a ‘starting five’ and someone to ‘come off the bench and shoot the three.’ That’s all you need – you don’t need a lot of people, you just need the right people. When you have the right people around you – the people that believe in you, that will push you, that will call you out, that will stand by you when times aren’t that good – then you have a powerful weapon in your arsenal.” -KS

Ashwin Nathan leads the marketing & digital efforts for HEB, the largest grocery chain in Texas with over $20B in revenue and more than 120,000 employees. COVID-19 has impacted their marketing, operations and supply chain, and has forced them to innovate faster than ever before in order to serve their community safely today, and in the future.

On this Episode of The Besomebody Podcast:

11:49 The impact of company culture.  “Being at HEB the last three years has been eye-opening in terms of watching a company connect its purpose to what it does every single day from a business standpoint. We exist so we can take care of our community, so that we can take care of our fellow Texans. We’re essentially a public service…It’s humbling to be a part of this with 100,000 other people who are just committed to serving Texas.” -AN

21:52 Marketing amidst COVID-19.  “I think the most immediate thing is to pull a lot of marketing, go dark in a lot of instances. In the sense that the most important thing is to make sure that you are not putting messages out there that can make things worse. For example, when you have marketing for specific products, whether it’s ice cream or paper towels or certain brands in the store, all of that right now is irrelevant. Your job right now is to make sure you’re helping the company with whatever is necessary from a customer messaging standpoint to make sure they understand that we have the supplies, we just need time to put it up.” -AN

23:57 COVID-19’s lasting impact. “All of our screen time is up 50% – we’re on social more, we’re watching the news, we’re waiting for that 5:00pm press conference every night – I really do believe that those types of habits, as well as people’s comfort with e-commerce, delivery, and things like that – will have people venturing into that process that never had to do it before, never wanted to do it before. I think they’re going to become new members of that ecosystem. There’s a lot of habits that are going to stay long after this virus is over.” -KS

25:03 This is the time for content creators. “Overall there’s going to be companies that are born out of this crisis and channels that are discovered out of this crisis. For all the bad and all the struggle, there’s going to be some winners…this is THE time for great content creators. If you’re a content creator – a writer, videographer, photographer – this is your time to create the best content you’ve ever created. Because you have eyeballs – you have opportunity. There’s going to be people that gain awareness during this crisis that will maintain it afterwards.” -KS

29:33 Leadership lessons for the “new normal.” “For me, there are a couple of things in the ‘new normal’ that I really want to do. One, support local businesses as much as I can. That’s something that from a new normal standpoint, the new normal for those guys is a lot worse than folks like me who are in a different situation. All of us have to figure out how do we continue to support local entrepreneurs, local companies, local businesses, our community – I think that is going to be critical and hopefully that brings us together. From a business standpoint, it’s brought more clarity to me in terms of what are the things that are most important that I have to continue to do to drive success with my team and make sure that we operate as a team, and make sure that we are contributing to the growth of the business.” -AN

38:08 Kash’s One Big Thing. “This is the time for great content creators to step up. You’ve never had all this luxury to sit at home and create. We’ve all had day jobs we had to go to, we’ve had stuff to do. Even if you’re working from home you still have more time, no matter what someone tells you. This is when you should be writing, taking photos, making that video, starting that podcast, starting that blog. Whatever it is, now is the time. It’s not just because people want to consume it, it’s because this is when you can refine it and focus on it. If you’re great at it, figure out which channel is best for you and go all in on that one because then that will be a platform for you long after this is over.” -KS

After working his way up the ranks of the UFC, Olympic Gold Medalist, Henry Cejudo, lost his first title fight. And it wasn’t close… Then, in 2018, he found redemption by defeating all-time great, Demetrious “Mighty Mouse” Johnson. Henry and Kash share their parallel paths and talk about their friendship that has endured the ups and downs of winning, losing, and coming back stronger.

On this Episode of The Besomebody Podcast:

6:17 Kash & Henry’s parallel paths. “If you want to be great, there are going to be a lot more downs than there are ups. You’re going to lose a lot more than you win on the journey to greatness.” -KS

18:31 Losing the title fight. “When you truly reach success man, you have to freaking really fall in order to reach success, because that’s exactly what that fight was. As an Olympic Champion, I was undefeated going into the UFC, fighting for the title, fighting the Pound-for-Pound Great. I’m a very confident human being, but what Demetrious Johnson was able to do to me in 2 minutes and 36 seconds…I ate some humble pie, maybe for the first time in my adulthood.” -HC

27:50 Henry avenges his loss. “It’s good to question yourself. You cannot be 100% confident or 100% sure on anything because that just means you’re not being challenged.” -HC

32:34 Fighting for the flyweight division. “It was my duty to save the flyweight division… As long as I became champion, the whole flyweight division, which is 57 people, was going to be saved. And the only way to save the flyweight division was to open my mouth and start talking, to amplify the [Triple C] personality. So, sure enough, after my fight with Demetrius Johnson, I called out TJ Dillashaw for the fight…the most important thing about that was I saved the whole flyweight division. That’s the whole moral of the Triple C story.” -HC

40:33 Kash’s One Big Thing. “But all I can tell you is we got knocked out. And we got knocked out so publicly. I didn’t want to go out or check my messages, he didn’t want to check his messages. But saying, ‘You know what, I’m gonna take the hit,’ you take the hit, and keep going. And that is the story of Henry Cejudo. And honestly that is the story of Besomebody.” -KS

Eric Baumann did everything from wash kegs to clean floors as he worked his way up the Brewery world. Today, the Karrikin Spirits Co-Founder and Master Brewer is spearheading his team’s efforts to switch production from alcohol to sanitizer for healthcare workers & first responders.

On this Episode of The Besomebody Podcast:

7:39 The official launch of BSB Group International (plus: we’re hiring!“We said we’re going to ramp up our hiring. Most people are not hiring right now unless you’re a grocery store, delivery driver, things like that. Because you want to be careful about your cash in hand, your cash outlet. But we said we’re going to take a step forward and be a little bold, we want to expand our team.” -KS

16:16 Becoming a Master Brewer. “I started with home brewing…I just wanted to get my foot in anywhere. I was willing to wash kegs, make soda, do whatever I could do to just get in a brewery. And fortunately, we found a brewery up at Grand Teton in Idaho and that’s where I started just washing the kegs, cleaning floors, and learning from mentors.” -EB

23:57 How the pivot happened. “Overnight, we changed the company. You know, the immediate thing was we really wanted to get [the sanitizer] out there to help society. That’s the main relief effort, to get the sanitizer into people’s hands that are essential to everyday life and business, and that are going to have the biggest impact on people. Like Amazon or Kroger or places where [the employees] are in contact with hundreds and hundreds of people daily. So, that was the initial thing, the humanitarian side…Then it became a whole thing overnight, it’s wild.” -EB

30:48 Layoffs, revenue & rethinking investments. “[Layoffs], honestly, are awful. It’s something you never want to do as a business owner. It’s something you never thought you’d be doing. It’s a very surreal moment, but we were faced with no choice. We’re a startup, we started a year and a half ago. Everything we’ve made we put back in the company. We don’t have the war chest. Even companies that have a war chest, nobody really knows where this thing is going to end, or when, or how.” -EB

35:44 The silver lining of innovation. “One of the other silver linings of this pandemic is it’s forcing all of us as entrepreneurs and business owners to be much more maniacal about the details, the strategy, and the decisions that we are making. We have to take it to a different level because we understand that we are working within an environment and a climate that is so uncertain. Every choice matters so much right now. Some of the aggressive choices we might have made six months ago, we’re thinking differently…but I do believe we’re going to see great innovation out of it.” -KS

43:23 Kash’s One Big Thing. “There are only two points that matter: the moment and the vision…the moment is what you are doing right now. What are you focusing on, what are you pouring your energies into, what are the strategies that you are turning into execution to ensure you’re doing the right thing, right now? The vision is that beautiful place that you want to get to, that beautiful thing that you want to create. Everything in the middle doesn’t matter. You can’t get attached to it.” -KS

Christine Day helped elevate Canada-based Lululemon to one of the premier sportswear brands in the world. Then, after witnessing her mother struggle with complications from Type-II diabetes, she knew she had to do something. Five years later, her growing company, Performance Kitchen, is taking on the frozen aisle, chronic disease, and Coronavirus.

On this Episode of The Besomebody Podcast:

8:54 Christine’s time at Starbucks & Lululemon. “Being so amazed by [Howard Schulz’s] passion, and purpose, and the type of company he wanted to build…What hooked me and really shaped a lot of my management philosophy was working for somebody who was really out to change the world through a cup of coffee.” -CD

15:06 Christine’s pivot to pursue her passion. “For me, I’ve always had a health & wellness bent to everything I’ve done. I’ve loved food and cooking and had a huge interest in it. But what really took me over the edge was my mother, due to a pancreatic illness, ended up with Type 2 diabetes and at the end stage of that, after 25 years, unfortunately went through limb loss and then ultimately dialysis. During the end stage of that journey, particularly after limb loss, going to the grocery store and trying to find food that actually met the doctor’s orders…I was shocked to see that there was nothing in the prepared food aisles that actually met the standards.” -CD

23:35 The mixed impact of COVID-19 on the food/grocery industry. “One of the biggest silver linings I really believe that’s going to come out of this is that people are going to demand more better-for-you options in the grocery store. They are going to demand to know what’s in their foods and they’re going to want more of those whole foods. They’re going to want to understand how they can boost their own immunity.” -KS

26:00 Food as medicine. “There’s been this juxtaposition where everybody knows that food can be a strong enabler on the preventative side of healthcare. We can help prevent disease before it starts. But I’ve also heard the other side of the debate where people say, ‘Hey that food as medicine concept is for the haves, not the have-nots.’ It’s almost this elitist concept. I think the struggle is for the big retailers to understand that this is relevant for everybody. Now, coming out of this pandemic, we really believe that people are going to be demanding it.” -KS

32:26 Leadership lessons from SARS & The Great Recession. “Having been through crises before, it’s so important to hold the vision for what the future can look like and take the actions that you need to take now to ensure the survival of the company and the care of your people and your customers. But really the long view helps. And that perspective of resiliency and the path forward and the view to what the possibilities are coming out the other side – it’s so critical to keeping your team engaged.” -CD

45:07 Kash’s One Big Thing. “People are going to look at food much differently. Fifty percent of this country has a chronic disease. We spend over $3 trillion on healthcare, yet we’re the most unhealthy country on the planet. Obesity, diabetes, hypertension – that is the epidemic. We’re talking about a pandemic, that is the epidemic that this country is dealing with. I’m hopeful and optimistic that after this people are going to start caring more about health.” -KS