Episode 18: Tai Morshed, Vice President at ONE Championship, Talks Ringing the Bell, Teaming with Heroes, and How He’s Helping Connect a Continent Through Mixed Martial Arts

When the startup he was working for went public, Tai found himself on the floor of the Stock Exchange and the center of the action. He thought he made it. Turns out, his career was just getting started. After taking a risk that led him to a job with Adobe in Southeast Asia, he found an opportunity at the intersection of his passion and purpose with ONE Championship. Now he’s empowering tens of millions of fans across Asia – and soon the world – to connect with athletes through storytelling and shared experiences.

On this Episode of The Besomebody Podcast:

18:24 When the risk pays off. “I took a risk leaving somewhere else where I was comfortable, and things were easy. I took a risk leaving Austin and going to New York. There were a lot of risks that I took, and that was really gratifying to see us IPO. I was there on the floor – I didn’t ring the bell, but I was a row or two right behind them, waving…It was a gratifying moment to essentially be able to own that space and say, ‘You know what, I deserve this. This is a hard-working team. I took some risks, and this is where it pays off.’” -TM

19:53 Believing AND building.  “It’s important to differentiate and to create that distinction between those who believe, but also want to build. Believing in the vision, mission, and principles is the price of entry – if you don’t believe, I don’t even want you to walk in the door of Besomebody, Inc. or BSB Group International. But believing isn’t enough – because you have to want to build. What does that mean? It means you have to be able to make the sacrifices, put in the work, produce the results necessary for the company to grow.” -KS

36:29 Building heroes at ONE Championship. “It’s not about the fighting. What they’re really trying to do is build heroes. They’re putting heroes in places where people need it the most. They need people who look like them or are like them to give them a sense of hope and inspiration that they can do more and be more in life.” -TM

42:31 The power of connection. “People want to be able to believe and see people and connect with people who look like them, who’ve been through what they’ve been through, who understand their history, values, and culture. I think that’s been one of the most exciting evolutions in marketing and advertising over the last couple years…When you think about now, the necessity for us to come up with – not just a white person, a black person, a brown person – but somebody who came up from your same neighborhood, who speaks your same dialect, who has the same challenges. That ability to connect at a niche and specific level is so powerful.” -KS

44:41 Uncovering the stories. “There’s some culture, there’s some adversity in life, and in all these places there’s these great stories. While we know if we just showed knockouts all day our numbers would be higher, but we’re not building the brand that we believe that can have an impact and that has long term value. That’s why we take the time to make sure these stories are unearthed.” -TM

59:04 Kash’s One Big Thing. “When you think about the ‘microstories’ that are out there that unify us and connect us, it’s way past the old school marketing days of ’45 year old white male’ or ‘single mom’ – it’s way beyond that. And when you can get deeper into those nuances of what makes people different, but also connects them, that’s when you can create that emotional bond with people. When you look at the future of content, the future of marketing, the future of storytelling – that’s where it is. It’s endless the amount of avenues and connection points that we have now on social media and digital. The companies that are going to be able to tell those ‘microstories’ in a personal, authentic, and relevant way, those are going to be the ones that are going to win.” -KS

Episode 13: Creativity Will Never Die – Andrea Diquez, CEO of Saatchi & Saatchi NY, Talks Global Growth, Working With Big Companies, and What’s Got Her Very Angry

Born in Venezuela, Andrea Diquez moved to New York City with a passion for theater. A few months later, she was in the throws at one of the largest and most successful Advertising Agencies in the world. Twenty-five years and numerous big accounts later – including Tide, Coca-Cola, and Toyota – she runs the company. She continues to lead with passion, optimism and positivity, and a contagious desire to do great work. 

On this Episode of The Besomebody Podcast:

8:31 Brands speaking up. “Sixty-eight percent of consumers say that they find it helpful when companies or brands are addressing coronavirus in advertising. Sixty-two percent of consumers say that when companies or brands are addressing the current crisis, that means that the brands have the consumers’ best interests at heart. Even though it’s a time when people, brands, leaders, marketing directors, and CEOs are a little nervous about taking these courageous and bold steps with their marketing and advertising, the data tells us that’s what people want. That’s what consumers want to see, what they expect. In a lot of ways, not saying something right now says more about you as a brand and a company than anything else.” -KS

17:58 Passion for the client’s brand. “You have to love the brand that you’re working on. I’m not going to come up with stuff that is going to destroy the brand or kill the brand. I’m actually on the same page as the client – when I work on a brand, I give it my all, as if it was mine. I really take care of it, and I get the team to take care of it and love it. Regardless of the brand. With all the brands that I’ve worked on, some are more difficult than others, but if you love it and you nurture it, then good stuff happens. Sometimes it takes two, three, four years, but it happens…I love the brands I work on and I really dedicate time to being part of the work.” -AD

29:46 Andrea on being herself. “I’ve never not been myself. My bosses have always been okay with that…I love that all my bosses have let me be who I am. Sometimes they’re a little scared, I think, but they’ve let me be who I am and that’s great. That’s why I’ve been successful. People ask me, ‘Was it hard being Venezuelan and getting to where you are?’ No – I’m here because I’m Venezuelan. I’m different. And people embrace those differences, and they were okay with it. They figured that by adding me to the mix things would become even better. I was very lucky with all my bosses, I still am.” -AD

32:19 Adding value to the client. “The last thing I wanted to be at our sister company, BSB Group International, is a “Yes sir, no sir” agency. I don’t want to just be executing what the client says to do. I always want to be able to have a point of view, have our personal passion, and expertise. I want to be able to say, as embedded strategic business partners, ‘Here’s what we recommend and why we believe in it so much.’ That’s something that I learned from you and from the Saatchi team.” – KS

38:34 Maintaining consistency with change. “When clients change, the first thing I do is try to understand a little bit what the client is – who the person is, where they come from, what they’re used to seeing. If it’s another company, it’s another company, if it’s the same company in another country or with another brand, I try to really understand a little bit of the background and understand where they’re coming from and what their forte is. That’s how we start our relationship in an orientation on what we do. It’s focused on what that person’s strength is. Or, I’m never scared of saying, ‘I don’t know too much about this, but this is a challenge we had and here’s how your people helped us.’ And always demonstrating that we love the brand, we know the brand, and we share the passion for growing the brand. And we’re there to build it with them.” -AD

44:08 The Triple Win. “For us, we always believe in the triple win: it’s a win for the customer, meaning it’s adding value to the customer; it’s a win for the business, meaning it’s driving revenue or profit; and it’s a win for the client, and for that in the corporate world it actually means that they’re ascending, that they’re getting promoted and getting recognized. Some folks on my team were like, ‘Well that means that we’re going to lose some of those clients that we have great relationships with.’ But that’s what we want – as long as we’re losing them because they’re going up and they’re ascending, whether it’s at that company or somewhere else, then we did something right and we’re on the right side of it. Then our challenge is to do that again with the next crop that comes in.” -KS

1:21:33 Kash’s One Big Thing. “You can’t talk about it unless you’re about it behind your own closed doors, inside your own company. A lot of brands are coming to the forefront right now saying, ‘We want to take a stance, we have an opinion, we want to join the conversation of what’s happening today in our society and our culture.’ There are so many issues that have been pushed to the forefront. But you can’t talk about it in a credible or authentic way if you haven’t addressed it within your own household, family, or company. You can’t talk about diversity if you don’t have a leadership team that’s diverse or if you don’t have a marketing strategy that connects with multiple cultures and multiple types of people. That’s so important. Before we talk about what we can do and how we can evolve our communications externally, we need to take this as an opportunity to look at ourselves and reevaluate how we’ve been running our companies, businesses, households, and families. That’s the opportunity we have today – use all the issues, conflict, and conversation that’s in front of us as a mirror to look at ourselves, what we control, and the fingerprints that we leave on everything we touch. And make sure that we feel great about that impact before we decide how we’re going to market ourselves. That call to action of authenticity and realness is so important.” -KS