Episode 6: Olympic Gold Medalist and Two-Class UFC Champion Henry Cejudo Shares His Redemption Story

After working his way up the ranks of the UFC, Olympic Gold Medalist, Henry Cejudo, lost his first title fight. And it wasn’t close… Then, in 2018, he found redemption by defeating all-time great, Demetrious “Mighty Mouse” Johnson. Henry and Kash share their parallel paths and talk about their friendship that has endured the ups and downs of winning, losing, and coming back stronger.

On this Episode of The Besomebody Podcast:

6:17 Kash & Henry’s parallel paths. “If you want to be great, there are going to be a lot more downs than there are ups. You’re going to lose a lot more than you win on the journey to greatness.” -KS

18:31 Losing the title fight. “When you truly reach success man, you have to freaking really fall in order to reach success, because that’s exactly what that fight was. As an Olympic Champion, I was undefeated going into the UFC, fighting for the title, fighting the Pound-for-Pound Great. I’m a very confident human being, but what Demetrious Johnson was able to do to me in 2 minutes and 36 seconds…I ate some humble pie, maybe for the first time in my adulthood.” -HC

27:50 Henry avenges his loss. “It’s good to question yourself. You cannot be 100% confident or 100% sure on anything because that just means you’re not being challenged.” -HC

32:34 Fighting for the flyweight division. “It was my duty to save the flyweight division… As long as I became champion, the whole flyweight division, which is 57 people, was going to be saved. And the only way to save the flyweight division was to open my mouth and start talking, to amplify the [Triple C] personality. So, sure enough, after my fight with Demetrius Johnson, I called out TJ Dillashaw for the fight…the most important thing about that was I saved the whole flyweight division. That’s the whole moral of the Triple C story.” -HC

40:33 Kash’s One Big Thing. “But all I can tell you is we got knocked out. And we got knocked out so publicly. I didn’t want to go out or check my messages, he didn’t want to check his messages. But saying, ‘You know what, I’m gonna take the hit,’ you take the hit, and keep going. And that is the story of Henry Cejudo. And honestly that is the story of Besomebody.” -KS

Episode 5: From Spirits to Sanitizer – This Entrepreneur Pivoted His Entire Business to Help First Responders & Healthcare Workers

Eric Baumann did everything from wash kegs to clean floors as he worked his way up the Brewery world. Today, the Karrikin Spirits Co-Founder and Master Brewer is spearheading his team’s efforts to switch production from alcohol to sanitizer for healthcare workers & first responders.

On this Episode of The Besomebody Podcast:

7:39 The official launch of BSB Group International (plus: we’re hiring!“We said we’re going to ramp up our hiring. Most people are not hiring right now unless you’re a grocery store, delivery driver, things like that. Because you want to be careful about your cash in hand, your cash outlet. But we said we’re going to take a step forward and be a little bold, we want to expand our team.” -KS

16:16 Becoming a Master Brewer. “I started with home brewing…I just wanted to get my foot in anywhere. I was willing to wash kegs, make soda, do whatever I could do to just get in a brewery. And fortunately, we found a brewery up at Grand Teton in Idaho and that’s where I started just washing the kegs, cleaning floors, and learning from mentors.” -EB

23:57 How the pivot happened. “Overnight, we changed the company. You know, the immediate thing was we really wanted to get [the sanitizer] out there to help society. That’s the main relief effort, to get the sanitizer into people’s hands that are essential to everyday life and business, and that are going to have the biggest impact on people. Like Amazon or Kroger or places where [the employees] are in contact with hundreds and hundreds of people daily. So, that was the initial thing, the humanitarian side…Then it became a whole thing overnight, it’s wild.” -EB

30:48 Layoffs, revenue & rethinking investments. “[Layoffs], honestly, are awful. It’s something you never want to do as a business owner. It’s something you never thought you’d be doing. It’s a very surreal moment, but we were faced with no choice. We’re a startup, we started a year and a half ago. Everything we’ve made we put back in the company. We don’t have the war chest. Even companies that have a war chest, nobody really knows where this thing is going to end, or when, or how.” -EB

35:44 The silver lining of innovation. “One of the other silver linings of this pandemic is it’s forcing all of us as entrepreneurs and business owners to be much more maniacal about the details, the strategy, and the decisions that we are making. We have to take it to a different level because we understand that we are working within an environment and a climate that is so uncertain. Every choice matters so much right now. Some of the aggressive choices we might have made six months ago, we’re thinking differently…but I do believe we’re going to see great innovation out of it.” -KS

43:23 Kash’s One Big Thing. “There are only two points that matter: the moment and the vision…the moment is what you are doing right now. What are you focusing on, what are you pouring your energies into, what are the strategies that you are turning into execution to ensure you’re doing the right thing, right now? The vision is that beautiful place that you want to get to, that beautiful thing that you want to create. Everything in the middle doesn’t matter. You can’t get attached to it.” -KS

Episode 4: After Leading at Starbucks and Lululemon, Performance Kitchen CEO Christine Day Has Seen It All – Now Taking on Coronavirus

Christine Day helped elevate Canada-based Lululemon to one of the premier sportswear brands in the world. Then, after witnessing her mother struggle with complications from Type-II diabetes, she knew she had to do something. Five years later, her growing company, Performance Kitchen, is taking on the frozen aisle, chronic disease, and Coronavirus.

On this Episode of The Besomebody Podcast:

8:54 Christine’s time at Starbucks & Lululemon. “Being so amazed by [Howard Schulz’s] passion, and purpose, and the type of company he wanted to build…What hooked me and really shaped a lot of my management philosophy was working for somebody who was really out to change the world through a cup of coffee.” -CD

15:06 Christine’s pivot to pursue her passion. “For me, I’ve always had a health & wellness bent to everything I’ve done. I’ve loved food and cooking and had a huge interest in it. But what really took me over the edge was my mother, due to a pancreatic illness, ended up with Type 2 diabetes and at the end stage of that, after 25 years, unfortunately went through limb loss and then ultimately dialysis. During the end stage of that journey, particularly after limb loss, going to the grocery store and trying to find food that actually met the doctor’s orders…I was shocked to see that there was nothing in the prepared food aisles that actually met the standards.” -CD

23:35 The mixed impact of COVID-19 on the food/grocery industry. “One of the biggest silver linings I really believe that’s going to come out of this is that people are going to demand more better-for-you options in the grocery store. They are going to demand to know what’s in their foods and they’re going to want more of those whole foods. They’re going to want to understand how they can boost their own immunity.” -KS

26:00 Food as medicine. “There’s been this juxtaposition where everybody knows that food can be a strong enabler on the preventative side of healthcare. We can help prevent disease before it starts. But I’ve also heard the other side of the debate where people say, ‘Hey that food as medicine concept is for the haves, not the have-nots.’ It’s almost this elitist concept. I think the struggle is for the big retailers to understand that this is relevant for everybody. Now, coming out of this pandemic, we really believe that people are going to be demanding it.” -KS

32:26 Leadership lessons from SARS & The Great Recession. “Having been through crises before, it’s so important to hold the vision for what the future can look like and take the actions that you need to take now to ensure the survival of the company and the care of your people and your customers. But really the long view helps. And that perspective of resiliency and the path forward and the view to what the possibilities are coming out the other side – it’s so critical to keeping your team engaged.” -CD

45:07 Kash’s One Big Thing. “People are going to look at food much differently. Fifty percent of this country has a chronic disease. We spend over $3 trillion on healthcare, yet we’re the most unhealthy country on the planet. Obesity, diabetes, hypertension – that is the epidemic. We’re talking about a pandemic, that is the epidemic that this country is dealing with. I’m hopeful and optimistic that after this people are going to start caring more about health.” -KS

Episode 3: Coronavirus and Hospitality – This Restauranteur Had to Cut His Staff in Half

Shawn Rao, Co-Founder and CEO of SynGroup built his business into a $20M force in the Texas hospitality industry. He was planning a venue opening in April. Then Coronavirus hit, and he had to lay off half his company.

On this episode of The Besomebody Podcast:

3:31 The world just changed. “Because of [the impact of COVID-19], we’ve decided to pivot our podcast focus from the conversations, insights, and guests that we’ve already recorded and that we had planned …to pivot to focus on businesses, entrepreneurs, and leaders who are on the frontlines of what’s happening with coronavirus and are contending with this pandemic in real ways.” -KS

15:27 Shawn’s lessons for entrepreneurs. “When you’re an innovative mind…you take the best of the best [in each industry] and always want to apply it to the craft you’re doing. And if you can take a little, piece by piece, you can always innovate and always learn.” -SR 

26:55 Adjusting to COVID-19. “We realized we had to pivot, we had to do some sort of pivot, to make this even a fringe-worthy concept, to make us sustainable for our employees.” -SR

36:02 An opportunity for community. “It’s an opportunity for all of us to come together to appreciate each other and to support each other. A lot of things that we took for granted before, we’re not able to interact with anymore. And then we see people that we used to walk by all the time and we never thought about -now we know that the patronage that we share, the business that we give, really makes a difference. I’m hopeful that we’ll come to a better understanding of how we’re all connected and how we’re all helping each other grow.” -KS

41:17 The most important aspect of leadership right now. “Everybody can be successful when times are good, but this is what I’m made for, when times are bad, to step up, be a leader, and be a role model. And show people what it means to be resilient and persevere.” -SR

44:51 Kash’s One Big Thing. “The importance of being able to stand out in front of the situation, of the crisis, of the circumstance. To stand in front of your team and your employees and to be able to clearly communicate the goal, the vision, the mission.” -KS