After helping lead his family business to a multimillion-dollar exit, a tragic loss and a life-changing injury shifted Badal Shah’s perspective. His road to recovery led him to the forefront of the growing CBD industry, and now he’s looking to make his most meaningful mark.

On this Episode of The Besomebody Podcast:

4:30 Traits of a winning team player. “There’s winning leadership behavior, winning leadership characteristics that people can still display and show, even if they’re lower on the continuum of capacity and work. Even if you’re a 4, 5 or 6, which isn’t really good for our company, but you’re displaying winning behavior, myself as a leader can notice it. That’s the character of the type of person that we want.” -KS

11:11 Badal’s early experiences with entrepreneurship. “My father was an entrepreneur. Seeing him growing up and his grind, sacrifice, and never being around – not by choice but by necessity – to make it work for our family was just something that really became engrained in me. My first entrepreneurial experience was with him and the family chemical business. Myself, my brother and father built a business that taught me a lot of things. It was really the hustle of doing it from scratch and bootlegging, trying to make something out of very little.” – BS

14:02 The evolving definition of “success.” “We sold [the chemical company] in January 2017 – you think you’ve been waiting for this moment, put in all this blood, sweat, and tears waiting for the wires to come in. You think that’s the biggest moment of your life. Three minutes after the wire hit, my best friend’s wife passed away. It just hit me in terms of what is really important in life. From that moment I wanted to challenge myself to be highly passionate in what I was doing and then also have impact. That became very important. You always think about what success means, then you achieve some of it and you realize that definition was wrong the whole time.” -BS

16:17 Money as a motivation. “I finally realized money isn’t number one. It’s in my top three – it’s number three. Number one is to make a positive impact on the world – legacy, things like that. Number two is to build that mechanism that makes that impact with people that I love and care about – people I love going to work with, and I enjoy being around. Number three is to hopefully be successful and make some money doing it. That’s really helped me get my mind where it needs to be. If I didn’t have the number one, that broader purpose, then I wouldn’t be fulfilled in the work…but also if I didn’t have number three, the financial, then I wouldn’t be able to serve as many people. I always see money as a symptom, not a purpose. Being able to build a successful business enables you to employ more people, help more people, make some more investments, and grow. The balance of those three things – of the impact that you’re making in number one, the right people around you, and then strong business and financial success as well – has been pretty powerful.” -KS

33:28 Preparing for leading in the post-COVID space. “How do we end on the other side of this pandemic as a market leader? We’re doing things, making investments, continuing with our growth plans. For example, we’re adding some highly sophisticated technical capabilities to be able to come out on the other side of this to be positioned as one of the leaders in the space that can both serve the industry from the B2B side, but also with two brands that are scalable and ready for global growth.” -BS

42:25 Kash’s One Big Thing. “So many entrepreneurs have to make these quick, gut, strategic decisions that blend both art and science, without a ton of data. But you still have to take that risk; you still have to go for something. When it works, everyone is applauding you and telling you how smart you are, how you’re a genius. When it doesn’t, you’re an idiot. That’s why you can’t get wrapped up in the wins and losses. You can’t get wrapped up in the applause or ‘boos’ you get, the love or hate you get from other people. You have to believe in what you’re doing, believe in the decision you made at that time, and make sure you’ve made it for the right reasons. You take the result as it comes. The same people that are calling you a genius today, are going to call you an idiot tomorrow.” -KS

After growing his company with a first-of-its-kind business model that pushed him to the forefront of Austin, Texas’ fitness scene, Shawn Martinez lost 100% of his locations when gyms were forced to close due to Coronavirus. Now, he’s balancing the need to recover with the urgency to evolve.

On this Episode of The Besomebody Podcast:

18:37 Shawn’s growth strategy. “It’s always been about relationships. Relationships have always been our currency…I didn’t want [the strategy] to be volume, I didn’t want to just be at every apartment in the U.S. We’ve always been very selective about what properties we partner with. We want to make sure the gym is hospitable to training, we want it to be top notch, we want to pick property managers that believe in the vision so we can work together and really be a blessing to all the people that live there by doing some really cool programs and just being creative in the space. We weren’t really in a rush to grow, we wanted more of the right partner.” -SM

24:36 The impact of COVID-19. “We make money two main ways. The apartments pay us a fee for our program and then we make revenue from our personal trainers. Without gym access we literally lost 50% of our revenue overnight. I wasn’t going to take a penny from our trainers if they weren’t going to be able to get access [to gyms]. I had to rethink how we were going to be able to hold on to our trainers.” -SM

28:03 Supporting the personal trainers. “One of the things I really respected about the Besomebody chapter that I was part of is that you guys took the time to interview and put together this really high-quality production of people talking about themselves, what makes them ‘them.’ I feel like there’s so much power in that, and that’s what we’re doing. What makes these people unique, and not as trainers, but as people. And we’re trying to pump that out to the world and trying to get [the trainers] some business.” -SM

29:18 The power of brand equity right now. “Brand equity, brand purpose, what your brand believes and stands for is so important right now. This is the only time – definitely in our lives, in this generation, most likely in the last century – that everyone in the world is experiencing the same thing at the same time. We’re all feeling the same thing, we have the same fears and anxieties. We also feel for our neighbors, our colleagues, our businesses, our friends that run local establishments that are going through this. Now is a time where people are rallying together, people do believe we’re in this together. The companies and businesses that double-down on purpose and values and show who they are in a positive way, are going to be rewarded with business after this is all over.” -KS

32:20 The value of vulnerability.  “All those times where I was very nervous to hit ‘publish’ or ‘post’ on the post because I thought, ‘I’m being so honest, I’m sharing my soul.’ Those are the posts, messages and stories that connected the most with people. It wasn’t about the likes and the comments, it was the fact that somebody said, “Thank you so much for sharing that. That really impacted me.’ There is so much power in being courageous enough to be vulnerable.” -KS

40:12 Kash’s One Big Thing. “Where I’ve seen the most value in our journey and in my personal life, is taking the time to really invest in those select few. All I need is a ‘starting five’ and someone to ‘come off the bench and shoot the three.’ That’s all you need – you don’t need a lot of people, you just need the right people. When you have the right people around you – the people that believe in you, that will push you, that will call you out, that will stand by you when times aren’t that good – then you have a powerful weapon in your arsenal.” -KS

Eric Baumann did everything from wash kegs to clean floors as he worked his way up the Brewery world. Today, the Karrikin Spirits Co-Founder and Master Brewer is spearheading his team’s efforts to switch production from alcohol to sanitizer for healthcare workers & first responders.

On this Episode of The Besomebody Podcast:

7:39 The official launch of BSB Group International (plus: we’re hiring!“We said we’re going to ramp up our hiring. Most people are not hiring right now unless you’re a grocery store, delivery driver, things like that. Because you want to be careful about your cash in hand, your cash outlet. But we said we’re going to take a step forward and be a little bold, we want to expand our team.” -KS

16:16 Becoming a Master Brewer. “I started with home brewing…I just wanted to get my foot in anywhere. I was willing to wash kegs, make soda, do whatever I could do to just get in a brewery. And fortunately, we found a brewery up at Grand Teton in Idaho and that’s where I started just washing the kegs, cleaning floors, and learning from mentors.” -EB

23:57 How the pivot happened. “Overnight, we changed the company. You know, the immediate thing was we really wanted to get [the sanitizer] out there to help society. That’s the main relief effort, to get the sanitizer into people’s hands that are essential to everyday life and business, and that are going to have the biggest impact on people. Like Amazon or Kroger or places where [the employees] are in contact with hundreds and hundreds of people daily. So, that was the initial thing, the humanitarian side…Then it became a whole thing overnight, it’s wild.” -EB

30:48 Layoffs, revenue & rethinking investments. “[Layoffs], honestly, are awful. It’s something you never want to do as a business owner. It’s something you never thought you’d be doing. It’s a very surreal moment, but we were faced with no choice. We’re a startup, we started a year and a half ago. Everything we’ve made we put back in the company. We don’t have the war chest. Even companies that have a war chest, nobody really knows where this thing is going to end, or when, or how.” -EB

35:44 The silver lining of innovation. “One of the other silver linings of this pandemic is it’s forcing all of us as entrepreneurs and business owners to be much more maniacal about the details, the strategy, and the decisions that we are making. We have to take it to a different level because we understand that we are working within an environment and a climate that is so uncertain. Every choice matters so much right now. Some of the aggressive choices we might have made six months ago, we’re thinking differently…but I do believe we’re going to see great innovation out of it.” -KS

43:23 Kash’s One Big Thing. “There are only two points that matter: the moment and the vision…the moment is what you are doing right now. What are you focusing on, what are you pouring your energies into, what are the strategies that you are turning into execution to ensure you’re doing the right thing, right now? The vision is that beautiful place that you want to get to, that beautiful thing that you want to create. Everything in the middle doesn’t matter. You can’t get attached to it.” -KS

The story of Besomebody from the early beginnings as a simple blog, to the evolution into a global content platform, through the highly-visible peaks & valleys of entrepreneurship, to today’s growth as a multi-million dollar company.

On this Episode of The Besomebody Podcast:

9:41 The Besomebody blog. “Those were the early days of Besomebody. Because I started to get so inspired by all these people. And I started to see that we’re all a lot more similar than we are different. I saw that there is a lot more that unites us than divides us. And I said, ‘How can I start sharing these stories, sharing these feelings?’ And we started with the Besomebody blog.” -KS

14:52 Funding & launching the world’s first experience marketplace. “We were growing fast…it was blog posts, inspirational visuals, video content. Tens of thousands of people have seen it. We ended up building this community of ten million people, and through those conversations I came up with an idea – to create the world’s first passion-based learning platform. It was an experiential marketplace where you could learn anything you’re passionate about by booking an experience with an expert in your city.” -KS

16:32 Trouble with scaling the app. “A lot of what we felt in 2014 a lot of startups are feeling now. I was just talking to a friend whose company laid off a lot of people because of the amount of money you need to scale marketplaces. We had to build supply and demand in every city that we were in…We had to learn everything from pricing, to how to market, to how to have the right instructors on board, the training programs, in addition to building the mobile platform…Getting out of Texas, getting to New York, getting to LA, trying to make it here to Ohio became very challenging and became very expensive.” -KS

18:54 Pivoting the Company. “We had an opportunity to pivot the company. Take everything we learned about bringing people together on learning experiences and reposition it to help them learn the skills they need to get jobs. It was a massive pivot because we were teaching people skydiving and pottery, and then we were going to go teach them how to be pharmacy technicians and dental assistants.” -KS

25:26 Kash’s One Big Thing. “I thought the journey was about passion. And it was in the beginning, that was the spark that lit the flame. But without the resilience that flame goes out pretty quick. There are so many people, incidents, and accidents that happen along the journey that extinguish that flame. If you don’t have that resilience inside you to keep going, you’ll never get there.” -KS